Techniques used by Elizabeth Warren

exaggeration - stretching the truth, to make something seem more powerful or meaningful than it actually is. (3 uses)

false claim - a statement that is directly contradicted by fact and can be easily proven untrue. (3 uses)

dysphemism - replacing neutral language with more derogatory or unpleasant terms, to instill a negative association. (2 uses)

glittering generalities - vague words or phrases used to evoke positive emotional appeal, without presenting supporting information or reason. (2 uses)

baseless claim - a statement that is presented as accepted or established fact, but is wholly undecided or unsubstantiated. (2 uses)

minimization - characterizing something that you don't want to address as trivial or insignificant, in order to shift the focus away from it and onto "more important" things. (2 uses)

misleading claim - a statement with a few elements or kernel of truth, which can easily be proven deceptive or fundamentally untrue. (2 uses)

ad hominem - attacking the character or motive of your opponent, while not refuting his facts or logic. (1 use)

guilt by association - using an opponent's links to another to assign the other's beliefs, misdeeds, or other unattractive qualities to the opponent. (1 use)

hyperbole - an extravagant statement or figure of speech used for effect, not intended to be taken literally. (1 use)

out of context - removing a passage or quote from its surrounding context in such a way as to distort its intended meaning. (1 use)

going negative - characterizing criticism from an opponent as being underhanded, unfair, or indecent in some way. (1 use)