Techniques used by Raphael Warnock

minimization - characterizing something that you don't want to address as trivial or insignificant, in order to shift the focus away from it and onto "more important" things. (5 uses)

ad hominem - attacking the character or motive of the person making an argument, rather than attacking the argument itself. (3 uses)

common folk - establishing a connection with an audience based on being just like one of them and therefore being able to empathize with their concerns. (3 uses)

labeling - pigeon-holing a person or group into a simple category and assigning names and/or beliefs to that category. (3 uses)

slogan - a brief, striking phrase that people will remember, which typically acts on emotional appeals. (3 uses)

honor by association - championing societal sacred cows to assume the respect, authority, sanction, and prestige of those symbols. (2 uses)

euphemism - replacing accurate language that may be offensive with language that is more palatable, to instill a positive association. (1 use)

guilt by association - using an opponent's links to another to assign the other's beliefs, misdeeds, or other unattractive qualities to the opponent. (1 use)

straw man - misrepresenting an opponent's position or argument to make it easier to attack, usually by exaggerating, distorting, or just completely fabricating it. (1 use)

loaded question - presenting a question that has a presumption of guilt built into it. (1 use)

passing the buck - shifting blame onto someone else for self-exoneration or to direct attention away from those really at fault. (1 use)

glittering generalities - vague words or phrases used to evoke positive emotional appeal, without presenting supporting information or reason. (1 use)

accuse of lying - reacting to undesirable truths simply with accusations of lies and lying. (1 use)

mirroring language - just repeating words from a question in your response, to make it sound like you're answering the question, without answering the question. (1 use)

misleading claim - a statement with a few elements or kernel of truth, which can easily be proven deceptive or fundamentally untrue. (1 use)