Techniques used by Hillary Clinton

slogan - a brief, striking phrase that people will remember, which typically acts on emotional appeals. (5 uses)

whataboutism - discrediting a criticism by accusing hypocrisy, in order to shift the focus away from oneself and onto others. (5 uses)

innuendo - implying something without actually saying it, which can't be refuted because it wasn't actually said. (3 uses)

straw man - misrepresenting an opponent's position or argument to make it easier to attack, usually by exaggerating, distorting, or just completely fabricating it. (3 uses)

going negative - characterizing criticism from an opponent as being underhanded, unfair, or indecent in some way. (3 uses)

bandwagon - creating social pressure to conform by promoting a sense of inevitable victory. (2 uses)

projection - accusing an opponent of using the same underhanded tactics or committing the same misdeeds the accuser is guilty of. (2 uses)

false claim - a statement that is directly contradicted by fact and can be easily proven untrue. (2 uses)

appeal to compromised authority - insisting something is true because an expert on the issue says it's true, when that expert has a vested interest in the outcome. (2 uses)

appeal to ignorance - suggesting that something is true simply because it hasn’t yet been proven false, or that something is false simply because it hasn’t yet been proven true. (1 use)

common folk - establishing a connection with an audience based on being just like one of them and therefore being able to empathize with their concerns. (1 use)

euphemism - replacing accurate language that may be offensive with language that is more palatable, to instill a positive association. (1 use)

FUD - making dire warnings or raising doubt about an issue, while provided little or no specifics or evidence to support the claims. (1 use)

labeling - pigeon-holing a person or group into a simple category and assigning names and/or beliefs to that category. (1 use)

adding qualifiers - adding an extra word or phrase to a response, which makes it ultimately meaningless, but still leaves the desired impression. (1 use)

exaggeration - stretching the truth, to make something seem more powerful or meaningful than it actually is. (1 use)

false equivalency - implying that two things are essentially the same, when they only have anecdotal similarities. (1 use)

appeal to pity - portraying oneself as a victim in order to gain sympathy and manufacture justification for attacking your opponents. (1 use)

misleading claim - a statement with a few elements or kernel of truth, which can easily be proven deceptive or fundamentally untrue. (1 use)

red herring - throwing an irrelevant fact into an argument to divert attention from the real issue at hand. (1 use)